We All Have Sinned

We humans have a tendency to justify or rationalize the poor choices we have made.  But we all have sinned.  We may even convince ourselves that we are better than criminals or others who have sinned more.  But, unfortunately, we are not better.  We all have sinned equally.

One of my favorite stories is about an older man who approached a younger woman and propositioned her to have sex with him.  She immediately turned toward him down and in an offended voice asked, “What kind of woman do you think I am?”  The old man then asked her if she would have sex for a million dollars.  She turned toward him with a smile and said, “Well, of course I will.”  The old gentleman stroked his white stubble and said, “Well, now we know what kind of woman you are.  All we need to do is to negotiate the price.”

We may go through life without killing somebody, but we should not congratulate ourselves and think that we are better than those who have committed murders.  Just like the lady who believed she wasn’t a prostitute, we may think that we are not murderers.  But under different conditions, such as war or revolution or starvation, who knows what we would do.  Would you kill your neighbor who during a depression was trying to steal your last loaf of bread?  Or would you kill a stranger who was trying to shoot your spouse?

Never say never.  We are all capable to killing and, for that matter, committing any number of sins.  We are all sinners and are capable of committing any and all sins.  We should not delude ourselves by comparing ourselves to others who have committed more sins.  We are no better than any of the criminals given life sentences for their acts of depravity.  And it serves no purpose to weigh sins.  Your sin is just as heavy as those of others.  And for those of you who are proud that you have never committed a sin may have the worst sin to deal with:  pride.

I remember a discussion about ten years ago when a church member announced that he believed that it was not fair for a murderer to repent his sin one minute before execution for his crime.  He thought that the murderer should be treated differently than him in the presence of God.

Quite frankly, I don’t know how the Creator will provide consequences for our sins, but I do believe that He will look on us more favorably if we don’t spend our time judging others and simply accept the fact that we are sinners.  Just like Jesus said, “He who is without sin, cast the first stone.”

I also believe that for each action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.  In other words, I believe there are consequences for our sins.  There may be consequences for our sins if they violate the laws of society.  Or we may provide consequences to ourselves if we feel guilty about what we have done.

But the potential for the most devastating consequences are out of sight and sometimes out of mind.  In a closed universe where matter and energy are neither created nor destroyed, there is a strong possibility that we will still be thinking after we die.  And for those of you who wanted to live forever, think again… and again… and again… in fact, think forever.  And without your senses to entertain you, you might indeed be in Hell.

But let’s be positive.  I am positive that we all have sinned.  I am positive that there will be consequences.  I am positive that we can prepare for the consequences, whatever they might be.  I am positive that if I repent of my sins and let God enter me and be a part of me, I will have an ally and guide through Hell.  Without Him, I will be lost in the chaos of Hell.

 

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