Your Own Perspective

Generally, we think pretty highly of ourselves.  If you analyze a bad situation, you typically will rationalize that you were in the right while everybody else was in the wrong.

For example, as an attorney, I handled many divorces.  I never represented a party who was in the wrong.  The opposing spouse was always the bad person.  In fact in most cases, I attempted to get the two parties back together or, at least, to resolve matters amicably without giving all their money to the attorneys.  Other attorneys hated me for obvious reasons.

It was not difficult for attorneys to get the two spouses to fight to the death.  I remember one attorney said the same thing after every comment made by his client, “I can’t believe that dirt bag did that to you.”  Then he would say, “Let’s take them for everything!”  Omigod!  Every divorce resolved with attorneys ended in a disaster for the clients and wonderfully for the attorneys.

Also, I handled civil litigation over car accidents and other negligent acts with the same results.  The attorneys did very well and their clients did not.  Again, I attempted to get the parties to agree to a reasonable solution, but to no avail.  One or both of the parties saw the situation from their perspective, which was always selfish and self-serving.  How can you reach an agreement with somebody who will not compromise?  Many times, it was all or nothing.

Road rage is on the rise as people have a tendency to view themselves as victims.  Again, it is entirely from their perspective.  A third party watching on the sidelines will have an entirely different take on how the incident occurred.  Typically, both parties involved in the incident are equally to blame.

One of my favorite stories was about an excellent judge who said, “If both attorneys, for the plaintiff and defendant, are angry with my decision, then I have made an outstanding ruling.”  The judge had it right.  Both parties are examining things from their jaded perspectives.  The truth is that neither one of them is accurate.  It generally takes two idiots to create an accident.  However, from each of their perspectives, they were not the cause of the accident.  It is always the fault of the other person.

You should distance yourself from your perspective.  Stand back from being so close to the incident.  Look at it from afar.  Let your perspective fade into the background.  You might become more respectful of others and their positions.  You might become more circumspect.  You might become more selfless.  You just might become a better person.

If you are still thinking when you die, then most likely you will be thinking from your perspective.  If you spent your entire lifetime thinking from this perspective, it is not likely that you will change after death.  This may be a major mistake.  A selfish perspective may lead you down the wrong avenue into Hell itself.  This might be why Jesus indicated that few would reach His kingdom.

As a Christian, I believe that Jesus died for our sins, allowing us to reach the first Heaven.  Paul, who discussed the three Heavens, probably heard this from Jesus after His resurrection.  The majority of Christians believe that they have been saved and will spend eternity in Heaven.

This is not logical to me.  The Bible clearly discusses the Judgment Day and consequences for poor decisions made during life.  It seems reasonable that God would pass judgment on us after death to determine whether we would remain in the first Heaven or enter the second or third Heavens.  It is logical that if we continue to view everything from our perspective, we will not reach beyond the first Heaven.