We Are in the Middle of the Universe

When you examine our universe from the smallest scale, which is the Planck length (1.6×10−35 meters) to the largest, which is the observable universe (91 billion light years across), we are in the middle.  And when I saw “we,” I am talking about our cells, or in effect, life as we know it.

It might seem strange, but the living cells inside a human body are smack dab in the middle between the smallest and largest things we know.  Whether that’s luck of the draw or a requirement for life or some other requirement for balancing the universe, we don’t know.  But we do know that generally things are positioned in the universe with design and reason and less by random selection, except for things found in the quantum world.

So, let’s speculate on why life is found in the center of the universe.  It may be the “goldilocks” zone for life to exist.  In other words, it may be the area that is just right for life to survive.  We know that the earth is in a “goldilocks” zone for protecting us from radiation and other hazards within our galaxy.  Our solar system situated about three quarters of the way outside the center of the Milky Way is in a fairly safe and habitable part of the galaxy.  And our earth is in a perfect location within our solar system for life to exist.  Perhaps, the same can be said about the location of our cells within the universe.

The center of the universe might be the safest zone as it is in the middle of two extremes.  Extremes, as a general rule, do not bode well for a fragile life form.  It might be the safest location for life forms.  Life, which would be susceptible to death from extreme environments, must have a safe nest for birth, growth, and development.  Cells and molecules appear to have that nest in a perfect location in the middle of the universe.

Now as the space-time fabric expands, the center of the universe does not change.  Life stays in between Planck length and the observable universe, no matter how much the universe expands.  It would be like placing a line in the middle of a balloon and then blowing up the balloon, watching the line remain in the center as the balloon increased in size.  The same could be said about the universe if it contracted; life would remain in the center if the space-time fabric decreased in size.  If we were on that line, we couldn’t tell if the universe were expanding or contracting.  Only observers from outside our universe could tell which direction it was going.

And whether our universe is contracting or expanding may not matter much for a majority of the time.  However, it may be important if we form a Big Crunch at the end of the contraction period.  That may be a point when life can no longer survive until we go from the Big Crunch to the Big Bang again.  This seems to suggest that the universe is a perpetual motion machine, which makes sense in a closed universe.

Speculation is permitted in a situation when our senses cannot provide us the information we need to answer life’s questions.  Because being in the center of the universe may block us from seeing the whole picture.

Water… Water Everywhere?

Is life unique to earth?  Or is other life in the universe?  Is there water throughout the universe?  Well, the odds are extremely good that both life and water are scattered throughout the universe.  And the odds are not bad that there are some forms of both life and water outside our planet within our solar system.

Scientists know that meteorites and comets both have water.  It is possible that many planets in the universe have water and potentially life.  In the future, we should be able to examine distant planets and determine if water and potential life exists.  At that time, odds makers in Las Vegas may place a 2:1 chance of there being other life within our galaxy.

Scientists used to believe that water on earth came from comets.  Certainly, some water did come from comets and meteorites crashing into our planet; but since there is more water inside the earth than in the oceans and on land, we must conclude that most of earth’s water came from some other source.

One theory is that most of our water came when our planet was evolving through accretion from water-laden bodies pushed from the ice-zone into our more temperate climate zone by Jupiter as it acted like a snow plow.  Jupiter probably meandered from the colder zones pushing proto-planets with frozen water into the inner circles where the rocky planets developed.

Therefore, Mars, Earth, Venus, and Mercury all benefitted from the water opportunity.  However, the sun was too close to Mercury and simply burned off its water.  The water on Venus may have evaporated into higher elevations with runaway global warming until it was blown away.  The water on Mars probably lost out to the sun’s radiation without protective magnetic poles.  So, only our world retained the water.

Where would other water and life be hiding in our universe?  Probably, life will be found on at least one of the moons of Jupiter or Saturn.  The gravity forces of Jupiter and Saturn, kneading these moons like a rolling pin on bread, creates geysers and probably black smokers in their deep oceans, which could easily become an environment for extremophiles, just like it is on earth.

And if water is found throughout the universe, which is logical since it is more common than we once believed, then life should also be more common in the universe than we once thought.  I would be very surprised if life did not flourish throughout the universe.  And we would be remiss if we did not mention the possibility that some forms of life could exist even without water.

So, does life exist throughout the universe?  I don’t know, but I would say that it is more likely than not.  And does this mean that there is no God?  Of course not… it simply means that God’s creation is much more complex than we originally believed.  And it means that with hundreds of billions of galaxies in the universe, we should stop being so anthropocentric.