Limitation of Imagination

We all have congratulated others on being very creative.  We know of artists, musicians, or even scientists like Einstein, who were creative geniuses.  Their imagination seemed to know no bounds, yet it did.  Their limitations were primarily based on their knowledge.  The more we know, the greater our imaginations become.

Unfortunately, we know very little about ourselves and where we live: our solar system, our galaxy, and certainly our universe.  We are still struggling to understand the earth and the depths of the ocean.  We don’t know how the sun and its cycles are impacting our weather patterns, so we blame it on global warming.

We don’t know where our solar system ends.  We see only about 10% of our universe in the form of planets and moons, so we know very little about the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud.  And we also know very little about the billions of galaxies with their billions of stars, yet this is only about 4% of our total universe.  The other 96% is called dark matter and dark energy, which we know practically nothing about.  And don’t even mention quantum mechanics.

So with so little information, our imaginations are extremely limited.  When cosmologists state that they believe our universe will continue accelerating into a Deep Freeze, I counter with the fact that their imaginations are in a deep freeze.  The truth is that we will never know how the universe works because we are limited on our facts and imagination.  Only God knows and He is not showing His creative hand… at least while we are alive.

I give cosmologists a good deal of credit for coming up with the idea about Phase Changes as a possibility for the end of our universe; however, this idea is a spinoff of what we know about the different phases of water:  liquid, solid, and gas.  Again, our imagination is fairly limited to what we know.

For example, scientists have no idea what dark energy is, so let’s utilize our imagination and see what we predict.  Dark energy may be a force that is repelling the rest of the universe and thus causing an acceleration of separation between galaxies.  But this is based on our understanding of magnetism when like charges repel each other.  If you were to question cosmologists about dark energy, they would have to tell you that they have no idea what it is and their imaginations are stymied.

Even when we let our imagination go to areas that are declared to be science fiction, it is still based on what we know.  For example, if I were to say that the red color that we expect to see as a property enters the event horizon of a black hole, could be the same as the red shift that Hubble discovered decades ago.  Then if I were to extrapolate the reversal of time at the event horizon with a reversal of time with Hubble’s red shift, my imagination is still restricted to facts that we know or think that we know.

This is an interesting analogy though since most cosmologists believe that the red shift indicates that the galaxies are moving away from each other at increasing speeds.  My theory is that the galaxies are stuck in a time-space fabric that is shrinking at accelerating speeds.  But again, my imagination is limited just as much as others on earth.

Can we create something different from what we know?  Well, we can imagine new combinations of what we know.  For example, we might speculate that life on a planet, which is light years away, has a creature with ten legs and five eyes, but we are still working with legs and eyes.  We can even paint an unrecognizable animal, but we will borrow from things that we know to create this beast.

So, clearly we are not even close to the Creator, our God.  In order to be with God, we must unify with Him.  We must trust Him and defer to His omniscience.  Only God could create the universe from nothing.  Scientists do not have a clue.

Megafauna Extinctions

About 13,000 years ago, close to 80% of the megafauna were wiped off the map.  Mammoths, mastodons, dire wolves, giant sloths, and smiledons or sabre-tooth tigers all disappeared.  And Clovis points made by Paleo-Indians cannot be found in dig sites after 13,000.  What caused this mass extinction?

About 13,000 years ago, a climate change occurred, called the Younger Dryas, also known as the Big Freeze.  The weather got colder and dryer for over 1,000 years.  Typically, the megafauna had survived many climate changes over the years, so why was this change so devastating?  Well, it seemed to be rather sudden with temperatures dropping about ten degrees and large dust storms and draught killing off plant life.  What caused the Younger Dryas?

There are two major theories as to what caused the Younger Drysas stadial.  First, scientists argue that the earlier warming period caused a significant influx of freshwater along the St. Lawrence River to the North Atlantic that disrupted the current and conveyor system that moderated the weather.  This could have led to colder weather.  Second, some scientists have discovered nano diamonds and other extraterrestrial evidence in the layers above 13,000 years ago.  They have uncovered fullerenes, extraterrestrial carbon carriers, which were also discovered in the Permian-Triassic layer, which could be evidence of a meteorite or comet that caused that extinction as well as that in the Younger Dryas.  Actually, the second theory could be the primary reason with the influx of freshwater being a secondary reason.

The Wisconsin Glacial Episode technically ended about 11,000 years ago, about the same time that the Younger Dryas ended.  The megafauna had survived significant climate variations during the different ice ages over the centuries, so why did the Younger Dryas lead to extinctions?  The first theory does not provide a good answer, but the second one does.  The megafauna could not survive the rapid changes caused by the comet or meteorite that may have hit.  Where is the evidence of a crater in North America?  Well, since it probably struck the deep ice sheets that covered the northern part of North America, the crater in the ice would have melted.

No Clovis points have been found during the Younger Dryas period.  Folsom points dating back to 9,500 years ago were the next spear heads located in America after the Clovis points.  The 3,000 year gap is difficult to bridge.   The Folsom Paleo-Indians seem to have genetic connections to Asia and the Clovis Paleo-Indians may have a nexus to Europe.  If this is true, the Asian presence either was able to survive the Younger Dryas period or entered North America when the climate improved.  They clearly were the forefathers of the Native Americans that populated North America when the European explorers landed on the east coast.

If you examine the moon, there are hundreds of craters, so it would not be unusual for earth to be the target for numerous comets and meteorites over the years.  Most of these craters have been erased by erosion.  If the meteors were large enough, they could have had a devastating impact on life on earth at that time.

One of these was probably the culprit that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs.  At the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, when the dinosaurs went extinct, there are large amounts of the metal iridium, which typically is not found on earth, but is found on meteorites.  It is highly likely that a large comet or meteorite impacted earth about 13,000 years ago, causing the extinction of the megafauna.

Global Cooling

For many years, scientists have been concerned about global warming.  And there certainly has been evidence of that.  But currently there is evidence of global cooling.  What is going on with our weather?  Is it warming or cooling?  Or both?

Even though greenhouse gas emissions have continued to increase, the global surface temperatures have not had a corresponding rise.  The “pause” in global warming since 1998 has little to do with greenhouse gases.

One of the problems with attributing climate change to greenhouse gases is that cooling or warming over decades generally are caused by the natural roller-coaster ride of weather cycles caused by ocean currents, increases in volcanic activity, and sun cycles.

For example El Nino and La Nina seem to have a more pronounced effect on weather patterns than greenhouse gases.  That is not to say that the greenhouse effect does not cause an increase in temperatures, but it indicates that internal variability of weather patterns can offset the warming of these gases.  Even the Atlantic multidecadel or Pacific decadel oscillations also have an impact on the climate.

Some models indicate that the ocean currents may be changing.   The Pacific Ocean seems to be locked in a cooling mode.  Of course, that could change, but right now we seem to be in a Global Cooling pattern rather than Global Warming.  It is likely that our normal climate patterns have been tilted back toward colder weather.  The Polar vortexes that originate in Siberia, crossing the Arctic Ocean, pushing past Canada all the way down to Florida may be more than anomalies.  The amount of snow and ice in past winters may portend more difficult winters ahead.

Mainstream scientists have been locked into debating whether there is global warming based on man-made emissions of CO2 into our environment.  This debate starts with the wrong premise.  The debate should be about what is contributing most to climate change?

Some scientists, who get little attention from the media, are saying that a major contributor to climate change is the sun.  The sun has cycles when the number of sun spots are decreasing, which typically triggers a colder period on earth.  Another group of scientists believe that there are cycles created by tectonic plate movement that cause more volcanic activity and earthquakes.  The volcanic eruptions can create a cooling effect by blanketing the world, blocking the sun.  Volcanic clouds will have much more of an impact on weather than CO2.

It is possible that the greenhouse gases did cause melting of freshwater which diluted salt water, thus causing a temporary global warming phase which is now leading into a global cooling phase.  The cooling could have been triggered by changing ocean currents which were disrupted by a sudden infusion of fresh water into our oceans.  However, focusing on reducing greenhouse gas emissions is not a good choice for us at this time.

We know that we are in between ice ages and will eventually return to another ice age, but our failure to understand the cycles, which may have little to do with greenhouse gases, might lead to poor preparation for the next ice age.  In other words, we may be wasting time debating greenhouse gas emissions, when we should simply recognize the cycle that currently appears to be leading to a colder period.  Then we should spend our time wisely preparing for the crop failures and other problems that are ahead.